Tag: bicycle

What Strength Training Exercises Do I Need For a Full-Body Workout?

To reap the benefits of strength training for cyclists, how do you know what exercises to do?

We know that strength training at least once a week will help build a stronger foundation for your on-the-bike work.

Strength training helps you ride faster, with more endurance, and more power.

But what do you do, and how do you fit it into your regular training?

If you understand the structure of the body’s six movements, they become an easy and effective structure for your strength training 

What are Different Strength Training Exercises? Use the Six Movements!

There are six main movements in our human bodies. Sometimes they are broken down into just four categories.

  • Push Movements (Chest and Shoulder)
  • Pull Movements (Chest and Shoulder)
  • Hip Hinge
  • Squat (bending hips and knees)

If you use these six movements as the structure of your workouts, you will have a workout that takes less time, is more focused, and works all the major muscle groups in your body.

Our goal as cyclists is not to build muscle mass – although I admit that adding a little bulk to my stick arms is nice – but to increase the capacity of the muscles to do work.

Plus I always add core work to the six movements, just to make sure I’m building torso strength.

Your workout, then, can include six or seven exercises: squat or deadlift movements; hip hinge like Romanian Deadlift; a chest press, a row, shoulder press, or pullup or pull down with shoulders.

Getting the Benefits of Strength Training for Cyclists Does Not Mean Hours in the Gym

I’ve seen some trainers alternate with Push and Pull days.

That’s fine if you want to spend more time in the gym.

But if your goal is to build strength for cycling, the more time you can spend on your bike, the better.

So I do all six movements in one workout that takes 30 to 45 minutes, two to three times a week in the off or pre-season.

For the deadlifts and Romanian deadlifts, I’ll do three sets to build maximum fatigue.

To get the benefits of strength training for cyclists, you only need to do two sets: one to find the right weight for the day, and the second to build fatigue.

Six Movement Structure Works With Different Weight Lifting Exercises

The beauty and simplicity of the Six Movements are that when you go to the gym, you can pick any exercise for a particular movement.

For example, a chest push might be a bench press, dumbbell press, seated cable press, machine chest press, or even TRX bands. 

And a chest pull might be seated rows, cable rows, bent-over rows, reverse push up on barbell, etc. 

As long as you do at least one exercise for each of these movements, you’ll get a full-body strength workout. 

A functional program with different strength training exercises helps bring about the benefits of strength training for cyclists.
Photo by Victor Freitas on Unsplash

Less Stable Equals More Strength

When you consider the different strength training exercises that provide the most benefit for cyclists, you should consider “unstable” loads.

The less stable the exercise, the more of your body will have to work. 

For example, if you do a one-arm dumbbell chest press, you utilize not only your chest and arm but your whole side to keep you from rolling off the bench!

Holding a dumbbell is very unstable, and you have to use more stabilizer muscles to keep the dumbbell stable. 

Alternatively, if you do a machine chest press, you primarily use just your chest and arm muscles in isolation. Those stabilizer muscles aren’t as required. 

That said, sometimes you just want to focus on one body part, or you have limitations that require more stability.

So if possible, I recommend using dumbbells, barbells, TRX, and/or kettlebells for the majority of your work.

There’s been research to suggest that single-leg or unilateral work provides the most bang for the buck in the weight room.

Doing Bulgarian split squats with one foot on a bench is a sure way to build fatigue in your hips and thighs!

What to Consider for Full-Body Strength Training

Consider these when you create your program:

  • One way to save time is to lternate movements, such as hinge and chest pull. Avoid doing the shoulder pull and press at the same time, though!
  • Do six to eight repetitions of heavy weight for each exercise for two or three sets each. If you get to 12 repetitions, move up in weight.
  • The goal is to fatigue the muscles, not jack up your heart rate. So if you’re breathing hard after a set, take a few moments to let the HR come back down. 
  • You can do multiple exercises for the same movement. For example, you can do a traditional squat, Bulgarian split squat, and pistol squats with the TRX to deeply fatigue your legs and hips. 
  • The older you are, the longer it takes to recover from strength work. I make sure I do intervals the same day as lifting. That way all the hard work is done in one day.
  • Doing a negative, or slowly releasing the lift, is a solid way to fatigue the muscles.
A functional program with different strength training exercises helps bring about the benefits of strength training for cyclists.

Strength Training Provides Significant Boost in Performance, Speed, Stability

Research suggests that cyclists should be doing strength training all year long, particularly people over 40.

The pre-season or off-season is the time to hit the strength training hard. You can still do one day a week during the season to maintain your strength gains.

Strength training throughout the year keeps your core stable and your hips and legs strong..

Let’s talk about how Simple Endurance can help you build a strength training program that works for your individual needs.

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Railroad Tracks, Prickly Bushes, Mosquitoes, and Mud Make for a Little Too Much Challenge

I love creating my own cycling adventure by finding fire roads or old logging roads.

This particular cycling adventure, though, turned out to be a bit more than I bargained for.

Amazing Gravel Roads for a Cycling Adventure in Sawyer County, WI

I was at my mom’s cabin in Stone Lake, Wisconsin, near Hayward. There are some amazing gravel and dirt roads that never cease to provide spectacular scenery and challenging terrain. The perfect combination!

I plotted the route between Google Maps, Strava, and Garmin. Each of them showed some sort of road extending from Ortwig Lane.

I love creating cycling adventure by finding fire or old logging roads. This adventure, though, was a bit more than I bargained for.
Those dotted lines seemed like a great adventure!

There Should be a Road Here, Somewhere

You can clearly see a dotted line extending from the end of the road.

When I came to the end of the road, I found a fairly open double-track that may have been an old logging road.

It certainly hadn’t been used for a long time!

I love creating cycling adventure by finding fire or old logging roads. This adventure, though, was a bit more than I bargained for.
Seems nice, right? I may have been a bit worried about bears, but this looked like fun.

It looked perfect for a cyclocross bike.

Soon, though, the path – since I can’t really call it a road – started to be more overgrown, more filled with logs and other obstacles like raspberry bushes and thistles.

The ruts also filled up with water and mud from a heavy rain several days earlier.

When You Can’t See What’s Coming

One of the more terrifying, then joyful moments came on a steep downhill.

I couldn’t really see the bottom of the path since there was so much overgrowth. So sometimes I ended up in mud that I didn’t see until I was in it.

But at the bottom of this particular downhill was a wide and deep puddle that I could not avoid.

Instinctively, I stuck my butt back as far as I could and plowed through the 10-inch deep puddle.

I was so surprised I made it, I laughed out loud going up the short hill on the other side.

I love creating cycling adventure by finding fire or old logging roads. This adventure, though, was a bit more than I bargained for.
You can see the ruts are disappearing.

There were fewer photos of the amazing scenery for one big reason: mosquitoes.

I swear I thought they might carry me off if I stopped.

I was worried that if I crashed or had a mechanical, I’d never get out, and rescuers would only find a broken shell of a man, whose blood had all been sucked out by Wisconsin mosquitoes.

Cross Practice During the Cycling Adventure!

There was also plenty of chances to practice cross dismounts and remounts.

I love creating cycling adventure by finding fire or old logging roads. This adventure, though, was a bit more than I bargained for.
I had a chance to practice cyclocross remounts and dismounts with trees like this.

After 30-minutes of this kind of riding, the trail came to an end in some kind of circle area. No way to go forward.

I turned around and headed back to another path-ish kind of opening I had noticed along the way.

This path was even less of a path.

And it got worse. I couldn’t imagine turning around and trying to bushwhack back to the main path-ish trail.

So I kept going.

Until I couldn’t.

End of the Road – Or Path-Ish Trail

All that was in front of me was a swamp.

To my joy, I heard a vehicle near me!

But around the corner of the swamp, though, was a steep hill of rock.

At the top of the hill, though, was a railroad bed.

And railroad tracks.

Not a road.

I love creating cycling adventure by finding fire or old logging roads. This adventure, though, was a bit more than I bargained for.
Those are railroad tracks. The only road I had.

Riding the Railroad on a Bike?

You know, railroad tracks are not great for a bike.

I’m not talented enough to ride on the rail. So I let a bit of air out of my tires and started riding down the middle.

It was amazing to see how much steel is left around the tracks: spikes, braces, anchors.

I should have collected it all and sold it all for scrap.

As it was, I could barely ride on the ties.

After a time, I just got off the bike and walked, hoping for a road soon.

Eventually, I came onto a road. It looked oddly familiar, though.

The road ended up being the same one I started on! I did a big loop.

I love creating cycling adventure by finding fire or old logging roads. This adventure, though, was a bit more than I bargained for.
Here is my actual route from Strava. The straight line is obviously the railroad.

What’s odd about the Strava map, which I have no reason to doubt, is that the path turned a bit north, when the road on the map clearly went straight west.

There were no other options, unless I somehow missed a path because of the overgrowth.

I didn’t/couldn’t pay attention to the direction on my Garmin because taking my eyes off the path might have resulted in disaster.

Gravel and Dirt Roads are Better Than Overgrown Paths

I did get a chance to ride some of my favorite gravel and dirt roads, though.

I love creating cycling adventure by finding fire or old logging roads. This adventure, though, was a bit more than I bargained for.
This is enough adventure for me!

I’m grateful that no bears ate me, nor did the mosquitoes carry me away.

I learned that some of the roads should be left for other equipment, like tanks. Or maybe in the spring, when there are fewer raspberry bushes.

I love creating cycling adventure by finding fire or old logging roads. This adventure, though, was a bit more than I bargained for.
Post-ride raspberry scratches

I’m going to stick with gravel and dirt roads or fairly well-defined double-track from now on.

Bears, hordes of mosquitoes, raspberries and thistles, muddy paths were just a bit much for me this time.

My next cycling adventure will be a bit tamer!

Time For Your Own Cycling Adventure or Epic Run!

Want to create your own cycling adventure? Want to do an epic run? Need training advice to prepare?

Contact me!

Cycling Workouts to Improve Endurance, Aerobic Capacity, Strength, and Speed

One of the biggest debates among cycling coaches is how to increase cycling endurance.

If you are not a pro, or not someone who can dedicate more than 10-12 hours a week to training, time is an issue.

And for those of us with a minimal amount of time, is it better to do more intensity or more endurance?

Tempo, Sweet Spot, and Threshold intervals work to develop fitness.

That’s clearly backed by the research.

However, the challenge in doing the hard intervals is the toll those workouts take on your body.

They require more recovery than endurance miles, precisely because of the intensity.

It’s easy to cook yourself and over reach with your training.

How to increase cycling endurance? Use a polarized training model.

Even with limited time, you are able to combine endurance miles with intensity for the perfect blend of training stimulus without building too much fatigue.

Polarized training can provide best of both worlds

With the polarized training, the model that Simple Endurance Coaching uses, cyclists spend roughly 90 percent of training time in the endurance zone. The other 10 percent is intensity that’s done really intensely.

We can put endurance days back to back to back without building too much fatigue.

The cycling workouts to improve endurance are either a good steady pace or full-on go!

Then, when we do intensity, we are able to do more intensity at a higher output, which is more effective in building fitness.

A cycling endurance training plan improves the quality and quantity of mitochondria, which creates more endurance capacity, strength, and speed.
A cycling endurance training plan improves the quality and quantity of mitochondria, which creates more endurance capacity, strength, and speed.

A cycling endurance training plan brings big benefits down the road

Endurance riding is not recovery or coffee shop rides.

An endurance ride means you’re able to talk with a friend, but probably not about religion or politics. (That means you can talk but not yell or speak loudly!)

A greater base of endurance means an increase in

  • the capacity to ride further and faster.
  • the aerobic engine to do longer and harder intensity work, especially during racing.
  • FTP or lactate threshold levels
  • consistent and consecutive training without building too much fatigue.
  • the accumulated levels of adaptation.

Mitochondria are the fuel of endurance

The increased aerobic capacity comes from increased mitochondria density as well as an increase in capillary production and other physical/ biological markers.

Very simply put, the more endurance miles we ride, the more mitochondria, fuel cells for the muscles, we build in our muscle.

The more we have, the more fuel we can send to the muscles, enabling them to work more efficiently and for longer periods.

And these endurance rides also allow us to go faster and harder when the time comes.

Plus the more time we spend at an endurance pace, the more we use fat as fuel!

A cycling endurance training plan improves the quality and quantity of mitochondria, which creates more endurance capacity, strength, and speed.

This is how to increase cycling endurance.

Here’s some background information on the discovery of how more exercise meant more mitochondria, which, in turn, meant more speed and endurance.

Not just miles but lifting heavy things and intervals

Recent research is suggesting that in addition to putting the time in on the bike, lifting heavy things and doing intervals also builds endurance.

Building strength by lifting heavy things also increases the muscle’s capacity to do more by creating more mitochondria AND making them more efficient at producing energy.

And HIIT sessions kicks up the endurance adaption to exercise even more.

The downside of both strength training and HIIT is that you can’t do them every day. Your body can’t recover.

You can, though, do low-intensity miles nearly every day, if you plan your recovery right.

Lots of endurance miles, HIIT sessions, strength training, and recovery are the key elements of polarized training at Simple Endurance.

Only recovery makes the adaptations possible

There is an adage for training: gains are made when you sleep.

That’s truth.

Recovery days, yoga, proper and adequate fueling , and hydration are all key elements to rebuild our muscles and make them stronger that before.

Start off slowly and build your mileage up gradually.

Imagine that your body is a house, and training and other stressors are the weather and elements. You begin with a house made of straw, and your first bout of training is like a gust of wind. It knocks out a few walls and so you build them back up. If you have the means, you’ll probably build the new walls from brick. When the next bout of exercise comes along, your walls are more resilient, and this time nothing crumbles. You keep training, and as you do, you increase your training load, or stress, by lifting more weights, running more miles, or throwing more pitches.

Christie Aschwander, Good to Go

How do I create a cycling endurance training plan?

Sometimes you need to go slow to get fast.

A good training plan includes at least one long slow day, one or two interval days, some strength training, yoga and/or mobility work, and recovery/ rest.

How that kind of schedule works together to build up to your target event or adventure goal is what I do.

I build your program focused on the goals, building your fitness so that you’re ready to go by event day.

Do you have questions? Want to talk more about how a program might look for you? Fill out the form below and let’s talk!

Figuring out how to create a cycling adventure gave me purpose and structure for my riding.

Laurens Ten Dam, a Dutch former professional cyclist, had planned to come to the States to do several gravel races this year, including the famous Dirty Kanza in Kansas.

Since all the gravel events were cancelled, Ten Dam created his own adventure called #DirtyKanzelled and put it out on the social medias to get other cyclists to do their own adventure.

Use Strava, Map My Ride, and Google Map to figure out how to create a cycling adventure: in my case a 100-mile loop with miles of limestone bike trails.
The bike trail along Hwy. 36

The Burlington-Elkhorn Loop

So I figured out how to create a cycling adventure: 100-mile loop that utilized the limestone bike trails in southeastern Wisconsin.

I went on Strava, Map My Ride, and Google Maps to look for gravel roads. Finding none, I looked for the bike trails. I had ridden everything except the White River Trail from Burlington to Elkhorn.

Use Strava, Map My Ride, and Google Map to figure out how to create a cycling adventure: in my case a 100-mile loop with miles of limestone bike trails.
The bike trail along Hwy. 36

Ten Dam’s guidelines were 100 or 200 miles, with as much gravel as possible, and with just two rest stops for 100 and three for 200.

I left home at 7 am, rode the gravel trail along Hwy. 36 to just south of Rochester, WI. It’s a route I’ve taken hundreds of times before.

The section starts at North Cape Road and to Wind Lake, where you have to get on roads through town and get back on the trail.

Use Strava, Map My Ride, and Google Map to figure out how to create a cycling adventure: in my case a 100-mile loop with miles of limestone bike trails.

The White River State Trail is Awesome

My route took me through Waterford and onto English Settlement Road through Racine County. I came to the White River State Trail east of Burlington.

This trail is amazing. Crush limestone, wide, lots of beautiful scenery.

I stopped at Casey’s in Burlington. In hindsight, I wish I had kept going until I reached the Pedal and Cup in Springfield. It’s a great little coffee shop that caters to people using the trail.

I reached Elkhorn on the White River Trail, and turn to head west. Somehow, the wind that had been in my face on the way to Burlington, had shifted and was now also a headwind.

Use Strava, Map My Ride, and Google Map to figure out how to create a cycling adventure: in my case a 100-mile loop with miles of limestone bike trails.

I was beginning to get a bit tired at this point, plus the roads were beautifully rolling. The route went along part of the old state road championship course! Good memories there!

The GPS took me on some detours but I made it to Waterford, where my bike said hello to its manufacturers at Waterford Precision Cycles. I stopped at another Casey’s for a break and more water.

Once in Big Bend, I picked up the Muskego trail. Finally, I felt a bit rejuvenated by getting on looser gravel. There’s something about pushing a big gear and rolling along in the gravel.

The entire route took me a bit over 6:15, which is not bad considering I was on a steel cyclocross bike on gravel trails.

Create Your Own Adventure!

Most of our events have been cancelled or postponed. It’s likely USA Cycling will cancel the summer races, and we’re holding out breath about cyclocross this fall.

So we need to figure out how to create a cycling adventure.

Friends have done marathons around their blocks, my wife and I did a virtual 5k through Map My Ride, and others have done virtual running races, bike races on Zwift, or time trials.

There’s no excuse not to create your own adventure or challenge!

Let me know what you come up with, and, if I can, I’ll join you!

And let’s talk: I want to hear about your training through the pandemic.

Creating your own adventure is a fun way to challenge yourself

Like most of us, I had plans for this year.

This winter, I had laid out at least a monthly gravel adventure race for the spring, in Illinois, Wisconsin, and Michigan.

I also planned to do several trail running events.

And while those plans have gone by the wayside, creating your own “Choose Your Cycling Adventure” will give you some creative ways to have fun, do something different, and still get in long training miles.

"Choose Your Cycling Adventure" will give you some creative ways to have fun, do something different, and still get in long training miles.

Create a “Dirty Kanzelled” Event

Laurens Ten Dam, a Dutch former pro racer, was planning to come to the States to race in Dirty Kanza Gravel Race in Kansas May 30.

Instead, he is encouraging people to create their own event on May 30, called Dirty Kanzelled.

“It’s a celebration of cycling to do a challenge like this,” he says!

You choose to ride 100 or 200 miles, trying to get as much gravel in as possible.

It’s a celebration of cycling to do a challenge like this!

Laurens Ten Dam

See the rules on his site.

Rogers-Vaughters Round 1*

Cycling Tips Editor Neal Rogers created a “Choose Your Cycling Adventure” when he challenged former cycling pro and current owner of the EF Education Pro Cycling Team Jonathan Vaughters to a race up Flagstaff in Boulder, CO.

Here’s how Rogers describes the genesis of the idea.

Rogers says, “The Vaughters things actually dates back to 2008, when I spent a week in Girona with the Garmin-Chipotle team prior to the Tour de France. I was pretty fit back then, doing some amateur racing, and went out on a ride with the Tour team that had three climbs. Riding on Tyler Farrar’s Roubaix bike, with a 46-tooth little ring, I hung well on the first climb, and only got dropped near the top of the second climb — around the same time Magnus Backstedt got dropped. At the time, Vaughters had been retired from racing for about five years, and he had let his fitness slide; I joked with him that I could drop him on Flagstaff, the main climb in Boulder.

Rogers said he and Vaughters live near each other and are the same age. But Rogers describes himself as an average athlete, while Vaughters, well, was a pro cyclist.

“So the whole concept was to explore what might win out, training versus talent, Rogers says, “That became a bit of a running joke over the years, but there was never any real effort to make it happen. That all changed during the winter of 2018. I needed a goal, and challenged Vaughters to race up Flagstaff in 2019. He agreed — it was good motivation to get fit —  and it was on.”

Due to some scheduling conflicts, the challenge didn’t happen until early December. Rogers says by that time, he had lost some of his summer fitness, and Vaughters was able to train a little more after the long pro season.

“There we were,” Rogers says, “a couple of 46-year-old dudes battling up the mountain. He put in a very hard attack on the steepest section of the climb, near the top, and I wasn’t able to respond; he beat me by a minute on a 35-minute climb.”

Here’s a video of the challenge!

* There will probably not be a Round 2…

"Choose Your Cycling Adventure" will give you some creative ways to have fun, do something different, and still get in long training miles.

“Choose Your Cycling Adventure” – Cheesehead Roubaix

I’ve ridden the Cheesehead Roubaix, a ride in Newburg, WI that has a mix of gravel and pavement several times over the years. It’s one of those rides where the front group goes pretty hard until it breaks apart at Lover’s Lane, a washed out gravel, dirt crevice in a hill that separates the fast guys from the rest of us.

Dave Hanrahan created the ride in 2010 as an “adventure ride” for his bike club. After riding the Gravel Metric in Illinois and seeing the growth of Barry-Roubaix, Dirty Kanza, and Trans Iowa, he knew that gravel was about to be a huge thing.

In 2011, Hanrahan promoted the event to a wider audience of cyclists looking for a challenge.

He was also “motivated somewhat by regional pride,” he says. “I wanted to introduce others to the roads with which I had made myself familiar, out-of-the-way places that most people would avoid if they knew about them at all. I wanted to show people that they didn’t have to travel to another state or to some remote corner of Wisconsin to find roads like these. Now, when the weather is nice, I can get 300 riders and the parking lot is dotted with Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, and Minnesota license plates.”

"Choose Your Cycling Adventure" will give you some creative ways to have fun, do something different, and still get in long training miles.

Create a Team Time Trial

Nathan Phelps has built the Gryphon Velo Racing Team into a team that everyone knows from the bright kit and good humor on the road. Team members also travel a lot to events throughout the Midwest.

But instead of traveling everywhere, the team has had to stay home during the pandemic. So Phelps got creative in continuing to challenge his team to stay active.

“To keep the team engaged, I set up a Coronavirus Pandemic ITT that runs every other week.” Phelps says. “Riders can hit the 15-mile course anytime over the course of the week. Timing is done using Strava and times are recorded. We’ll do this every other week until … whenever.”

While Gryphon has been doing intra-team time trials for years, more people are participating this year.

“It gives all of us something to connect over (who doesn’t like comparing times?),” Phelps says, “and to push ourselves when we otherwise might not. Four of us ended up on the course at the same time (unplanned) a few weeks ago, it was nice to see some teammates again.”

Tour of Milwaukee and Burlington Gravel Ride

I have two adventure rides that I like to do, both “Choose Your Cycling Adventure” material.

The Tour of Milwaukee uses bike trails and streets with bike lanes to take a big loop around the city. It uses the Oak Leaf Trails, Interurban Trails, and some pretty good roads. Good stops along the way for coffee as well.

The Burlington Gravel Ride is my preferred gravel and limestone trail ride. It has a lot of pavement on the course, but those roads are out in the country.

I added a loop including the White River Trail to get a 100-mile ride to do Dirty Kanzelled.

Got Your Own Cycling Adventure Route? Share it Here!

I’d love to see your adventures on bikes! Share them in the comments.

Want to Talk About Training for Your Adventure?

If you’re stuck inside or want to step up your intervals, doing a spin bike workout is a great way to get some solid work in in a short amount of time.

Bicycling Magazine posted a story about three good spin bike workouts if you are riding solo inside. They could also be used for a bike on a trainer.

The Indoor Spin Bike Workout for Speed

No hills here: This 30-minute workout was designed for high accelerations at low to moderate resistance.

  • 3-minute warm-up at light to moderate pace in the saddle and third position
  • 30-second sprint followed by 30-second easy cycle; alternate for 6 minutes
  • 3 minutes at moderate pace in saddle or third position
  • repeat previous 2 steps for a total of 3 rounds
  • 3-minute cool down at an easy pace

The Tabata Indoor Spin Workout

In this type of HIIT workout, the intervals are intense and quick with a small recovery window. (This is the type of class I typically do when I’m teaching the Cycle class.)

  • 5-minute warm-up at light to moderate pace
  • 8 x 20-second push in third position with moderate resistance followed by 10-second recovery
  • 1-minute recovery in saddle at low to moderate resistance and speed
  • Repeat above intervals and recovery one more time
  • 1-minute recovery in saddle at low to moderate resistance and speed
  • 4 x 40-second push in saddle with light to moderate resistance, followed by 20-second recovery
  • 1-minute recovery in saddle at low to moderate resistance and speed
  • Repeat above intervals and recovery one more time
  • 60-second push at maximum effort
  • 5-minute cooldown
Here are three good workouts for the spin bike when you're inside.

The Endurance Indoor Spin Workout

Having endurance is the ability to push forward even when fatigued—so this 45-minute ride is aerobic and designed to build stamina. This one’s a little tougher, and meant for more advanced riders. For beginner riders, use the two workouts above to build up to this one.

  • 5-minute warm-up at low to moderate pace
  • 60-second push in the saddle between 80-100 RPMs at moderate resistance (should feel like 60 percent of your max effort)
  • 30-second recovery
  • 90-second push in the saddle with a little more resistance than the previous interval; maintain 90 RPMs
  • 30-second recovery
  • 120-second push with a touch more on the resistance; maintain at least 80 RPMs
  • 5-minute recovery
  • repeat drill sequence and recovery 3 more times
  • 5-minute cooldown